A Place at the Table – 08 – Treadmill

As much as the children of Israel are Your beloved children, we are as well. Forgive us for finding our identity in our vocation or our stuff rather than You. It is so easy to get caught up in making bricks that validate our status to the world, that add to our corporation’s profits, or that help us escape the problems in our household. May we put our hand to the plow and work as those who have a higher calling. In the days that come, Lord, reveal to us new patterns of living where our spiritual lives and work lives become an integrated whole. May all that we do be worship to You. Amen.

——

I am one of those rather obsessive gym people. 5-6 days a week, you’ll find me in the gym usually on an elliptical machine or doing the circuit weights. You will rarely, however, find me on the treadmill. Not sure why, but me and the treadmill have never had a quality relationship. So, while I am not on the treadmill at the gym, I do live on the treadmill of life – the treadmill that Seay accurately describes in today’s devotion. He references back to the Exodus story of the Egyptians forcing the Hebrews to make the same amount of bricks but with less straw and other resources supplied. Even with the pleading and attempts to convince, the Pharaoh doesn’t relent. Same bricks. Keep working. Work harder. Work some more.

I don’t know if life is any busier today than it used to be, but it is definitely a challenge to stay above water with all the commitments that we jump into. Busy has become such a cliched response to people asking how we are doing. How are you? Busy!!!!

Seay writes…

I wonder if you remember the last time you laughed yourself sore. The last time that you played with a child and got lost in an imaginary world. The last time you abandoned the need to produce something to be measured by the standards of this world. How often do we hear the equivalent of what the Israelites in Egypt heard: “How many bricks did you make?” “How much money did you make?”

The first part he lifts up in that quote – laughing yourself sore…that’s a good measure for me…when I get into places where I can’t remember the last time I did that, then its time to slow down, to get off the treadmill, and be still and rest.

While its easy to say that, its harder to do, especially for those who live paycheck to paycheck or who struggle with the everyday necessities of life. How can I, can we, work to lessen the load for others as well?

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.